Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Garden History Images of the Week: Mexican landscapes in the Codex pictorius Mexicanus of Ignacio Tirsch







These images are so beautiful that they actually make me feel the pangs of nostalgia--for a Mexico I never saw and never will see.  Circa 1762, they are the work of Father Ignacio Tirsch,  Jesuit missionary to the Baja peninsula, who over the five years of his sojourn there created a portfolio of forty-eight drawings rich in garden history; recording both productive and decorative landscapes, as well as native flora.  The entire volume--architecture, costumes, flora and fauna--is a treasure of the Czech National Library, online at manuscriptorium (click on 'facsimile' to see the images).

8 comments:

Hedera said...

Charming and fascinating. I've just visited (and bookmarked) the above link - thank you :)

Martha said...

Wonderful post.
I love your blog and it's one of the few that I always read.

Patty said...

These are beautiful paintings. I tried to view more at the link you provided but was unable to 'see' the book. Perhaps one has to belong to the organization?

Commonweeder said...

I cannot tell you how much I enjoy your blog - so full of things I never knew about. right now I am reading The Founding Gardeners by Andrea Wulf so I am getting an extra dose of garden and American history. What fun!

College Gardener said...

These images are really fascinating. Thank you for always posting such great materials!

Patricia Tryon said...

To me, these are reminiscent of tapestries. It seems like they might "translate" quite beautifully into needlepoint.

HDC said...

wow, its simply superb... great peace of work..

Cassy said...

Those images are Simply beautiful!

Cassy from Acoustic Guitar Lessons

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