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Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: Special Issue on Botanical Gardens


I've been receiving some lovely emails lately from readers of the blog who are new to Garden History (thank you all!) and so will be posting some this week about where and what to study....

The journal Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes is one of the two 'scholarly' journals devoted to Garden History. They have just published a special issue on botanical gardens...

"Botanic gardens are places where knowledge is gathered, preserved, imparted and experimented with. They are places of scientific practice and communication where architectural and aesthetic concepts have only a supportive role serving botanical experimentation as well as the presentation of plant systematics. Botanic gardens are conventionally regarded as encyclopaedias planted for reference and, consequently, as a balance against the fixed and theoretical knowledge available through herbaria and botanical literature. This volume includes most of the papers presented during our symposium entitled “Botanical Gardens within Global and Local Dynamics — Sociability, Professionalization and Diffusion of Knowledge” and has been completed with papers focusing particularly on design and science within botanic gardens. In putting botanic gardens in their scientific and social context, I hope that we can contribute with this set of papers to a better understanding of the identity of botanic gardens as scientific institutions within a global history of gardens."


The single issue is available for $40 from the publisher.

As with most scholarly journals, a subscription is beyond the scope of average individuals, $357 per year. But if you are affiliated with a university you might ask if the library would consider subscribing.

Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes is edited by John Dixon Hunt, of the University of Pennsylvania, whose books are required reading in the field.
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1 comment:
kate said...

I just discovered your blog through Blotanical.com. If garden history had been an option when I was student, I would have studied it. Instead I got a degree in history before going off to study law.

I love reading about gardens and gardeners of the past and would enjoy this journal - I'm going to have to track it down.

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